KEMENTERIAN LINGKUNGAN HIDUP

REPUBLIK INDONESIA

The second Forest Day event was held at the University of Adam
Mickiewicz, in Poznań, Poland, on Saturday, 6 December 2008. It took
place in parallel with the fourteenth session of the Conference of the
Parties (COP 14) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change (UNFCCC) and the fourth Conference of the Parties serving as the
Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP/MOP 4), held in
Poland from 1-12 December 2008. It was convened in order to facilitate
discussions on the potential to incorporate forests into climate change
mitigation and adaptation strategies at both the global and national
level.

Forest Day 2 was co-hosted by the Centre for International
Forest Research (CIFOR), the Government of Poland and the Collaborative
Partnership on Forests (CPF). Following on the positive response to the
first Forest Day held on 8 December 2007 in Bali, Indonesia during
UNFCCC COP 13, Forest Day 2 brought together nearly 900 participants
from a diverse range of forest stakeholders, academics and decision
makers from around the world, to discuss key issues that link forests
with climate change. Cross-cutting themes that were considered
included: adaptation of forests to climate change; addressing forest
degradation through sustainable forest management; capacity building
for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation
(REDD); and options for integrating REDD into the global climate
regime. In addition, participants took part in nearly 40 related side
events.

A drafting committee representing members of the CPF produced
a summary of key messages that emerged in the course of the day, to be
forwarded to the UNFCCC Secretariat:
http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/publications/pdf_files/cop/cop14/Summary-Forest-Day-2.pdf

On Sunday, many participants participated in a field trip organized by
the Polish State Forests National Forest Holding to observe a local
sustainable forest management project.


Following on the positive
response to the first
Forest Day held on 8 December 2007 in Bali, Indonesia during UNFCCC COP 13
,
Forest Day 2 brought together nearly 900 participants from a diverse range of
forest stakeholders, academics and decision makers from around the world, to
discuss key issues that link forests with climate change. Cross-cutting
themes
that were considered included: adaptation
of forests to climate change
; addressing forest
degradation through sustainable forest management
; capacity
building for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation
(REDD)
; and options for integrating REDD into the global climate regime.

Participants also attended
a poster exhibition and around forty side events with themes including: REDD
for rural development; indigenous and local community perspectives on forests
and climate change; the business case for REDD mechanisms for biodiversity
conservation and human well-being; REDD and peatland conservation and
restoration; and improving global forest monitoring using accurate satellite
imagery. For more information on the side events, see: http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/Events/COP14-ForestDay/Side+Events.htm

A drafting committee
representing members of the CPF produced a summary of key messages that emerged
in the course of the day, to be forwarded to the UNFCCC Secretariat. Key
messages included: that climate change adaptation and mitigation are linked,
particularly in the context of forests; that it is important to involve women,
the poor, and indigenous peoples in the design and operation of forest-related
climate change policies; and that forests provide significant co-benefits
beyond carbon storage. Differing views were expressed on whether and how these
benefits should be monetized and included in a potential regime for REDD.

On Sunday, many
participants participated in a field trip organized by the Polish State Forests
National Forest Holding to observe a local sustainable forest management
project.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF
FORESTS AND CLIMATE CHANGE

In its Fourth Assessment
Report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculates that
about 20% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions during the 1990s resulted
from land use change, primarily deforestation, with the remaining 80% resulting
from fossil fuel burning. At the same time, 25% of total emissions are
estimated to have been absorbed by terrestrial ecosystems through replacement
vegetation growth on cleared land, land management practices and the
fertilizing effects of elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen deposition. Forests
therefore are an integral part of the global carbon cycle.

Depending on the age of the
forest, the management regime, and other biotic and abiotic disturbances
(insects, pests, forest fires), forests can act as reservoirs, sinks (removing
greenhouse gases from the atmosphere) or as sources of greenhouse gases.
Forests also provide a number of vital services, notably as repositories of
biodiversity and regulators of the hydrological cycle. Reducing deforestation
and land degradation and improving forest cover are notable for being both
mitigation and adaptation strategies.

However, including
emissions reduced from forest-related activities in a carbon accounting system
is also notoriously complex, given the non-permanent nature of carbon uptake by
trees, and the potential for “leakage